chick fil a protest

Protestors storm Chick-fil-A opening in Toronto

We all knew it was coming, but the day is finally here. 

Chick-fil-A opened its doors a few minutes early this morning in Toronto, and while some hungry patrons waited overnight to get their hands on fried chicken, protestors also showed up to crash the party. 

The American fried chicken chain is extremely popular south of the border, but they're also known for their notoriously homophobic CEO Dan Cathy and for funding anti-LGBTQ2 groups.

Activist groups in Toronto including LiberationTO and members of The 519 announced plans to protest the opening in advance, and they sure stayed true to their word. 

Protesters stood in front of the restaurant at 1 Bloor Street E. holding signs saying "Cluck off," and "Not in our city. United against homophobia."

They chanted "Homophobia's got to go, hey hey, ho ho," in unison. 

Some of the city's favourite drag queens were also on location to participate in the protest. 

While homophobia and transphobia are undoubtedly the largest controversies surrounding Chick-fil-A's arrival in Toronto, activists also protested their treatment of animals. 

They staged a die-in in honour of the slaughtered chickens, and customers had to literally step over their bodies just to get into the store. 

Police were on site to keep the whole thing peaceful and calm, but activists have committed to protesting the restaurant all weekend long and an Evangelical Christian group has also vowed to counter-protest ⁠— so it remains to be seen whether things will get heated. 

Lead photo by

Ronald Quitoriano


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