midges toronto

Pesky midges have taken over Toronto again

If your home has been inundated with little annoying flies in recent days, you're definitely not alone, because it's midge season once again in Toronto.

Midges, which look a bit like a cross between fruit flies and mosquitoes, appear in swaths in both the spring and the fall each year, peskily crowding onto window screens, all over patios and around sliding glass doors.

The harmless insects are of the non-biting variety, thankfully, and don't cause much trouble outside of being a nuisance (and making a bit of a mess when hundreds of their corpses pile up).

They are fond of water, though, which is why they're common in the city — especially by the lake, where they're known to collect and mate in swarms, exasperating unsuspecting runners and cyclists who end up covered in the little buggers.

Though they may not serve as the tastiest snack for humans, they are for local fish.

They also apparently have an affinity for light when freshly-hatched, like many bugs, and so tend to gravitate toward condo towers.

Fortunately, the chironomids have a short life cycle and usually make their exodus within a few days, after sufficiently infuriating residents.

In the meantime, perhaps consider keeping your windows and doors closed, avoiding swampy areas and bodies of water, and holding your breath when you pass a cloud of them.

Lead photo by

Ben Roffelsen Photography


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