504 king streetcar toronto

Toronto is now loving the 504 streetcar

We all knew that the King Street Pilot Project would change Toronto, but who could have predicted how much – or how quickly – it would change everyone's mind about the 504 streetcar?

The notoriously crammed and painfully slow TTC route is currently the belle of the public transit ball, which feels surreal if you've ever been sardine-canned into a King car during rush hour.

Or if you've waited for what feels like 500 minutes behind a row of 13 stopped streetcars on your way home from work. Or if you've watched a jam-packed streetcar sail by you without stopping in the morning, because it's too full, at least once a week for the past two years.

Streetcar riders have been abuzz all day over how shockingly fast their morning commutes were along King Street.

As it turns out, transit vehicles can move very quickly when they're not all mucked up by traffic and drivers trying to turn left.

Some commuters say the amount of time they've spent on the red rocket has been cut in half (or more) since the pilot project came into effect – which is strong praise for a city initiative that only launched yesterday.

In fact, I haven't seen so many nice words about the 504 streetcar on Twitter in... probably ever.

And so begins the 504 streetcar's redemption arc.

Drivers may be having a bit of trouble with The King Street Pilot Project, but it's already a hit among the estimated 65,000 people who travel King by streetcar every single day.

Lead photo by

CJ Burnell


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