toronto raves

10 signs you were a Toronto raver in the 1990s

By the mid 1990s Toronto had one of the biggest rave scenes in North America. On most weekends there were a variety of underground events taking place in warehouses, lofts and more well known venues like the Ontario Science Centre. If you were there then this is what you may remember now.

Here are 10 signs you were a Toronto raver in the 1990s.

1. You still talk about the first rave at Ontario Science Centre in 1993.

2. You had fake $3 bills with Shaggy on them by X-Static in your wallet or taped to your wall.

3. You tested out some of Dr. Trance's gadgets at his laboratory.

4. You went to Mark Oliver's set at 23 Hop before he got mainstream.

5. You lost your friends inside a 300+ packed Atlantis and or Nitrous warehouse party because they didn't own a cellphone.

6. You took a ride on the Pleasure Force "magic school bus" to a rave in the middle of a nowhere.

7. You remember 100 riot police standing outside Cherry Beach studios, and "Ballroom Blitz" playing before cops literally pulled the plug.

8. You shopped at "Bi-Way" for dancing shoes.

9. You got CD and LP recommendations from Eugene at Play de Record, Paul at The Pit and Lou at Fresh.

10. You were upset over Allan Ho's death and protested City Hall's Rave Ban in 1999.

What signs did I miss? Add them to the comments.

See also: 10 signs you were a Toronto raver in the 2000s

Writing by Trent Lee.


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