NXNE Action Bronson

NXNE under pressure to cancel Action Bronson concert

An online petition calling for NXNE to cancel one of its top-billed concerts has gained significant traction since being posted yesterday. So much so, in fact, that the music festival has issued a statement about the matter.

The petition calls out NXNE, NOW Magazine, sponsor Vans Footwear, and the City of Toronto for hosting an artist who "glorifies gang-raping and murdering women." It's not the first time that the rapper has stirred controversy, but the call for his removal is probably not something the festival was expecting.

NXNE's response to the petition is underwhelming, highlighted by PR-speak and a polite refusal to drop the show. "NXNE believes each and every one of these artists have the right to express their views through music, but those views belong to them and them alone," a press release issued today reads.

"Those who are offended by an artist are invited to check out other festival showcases, as NXNE will present hundreds of artists this June - some may be considered controversial, but most are just plain fun."

I don't know about you, but that last sentence reads as mighty passive aggressive for a statement that putatively aims to quell the controversy that's ensued since the petition was launched. What do you think? Should NXNE drop this concert from its lineup?

Photo by Eric Brisson


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