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Kids on Ohbijou


The concept of a mash-up (be it songs or bands) is certainly nothing new, but bringing together 2 Toronto bands that are stylistically polar opposites and sticking them together on the altar of a church in their undies ... well...ohhhh yeaahhh. Enter Kids On TV + Ohbijou.

Dan (Woodhands) Werb brought a reverent hush to the Music Gallery on Saturday with a dramatic stride up the center aisle to the grand piano, but after his second number all piety was banished. "This is supposed to be a dance orgy!", Werb teased. "I see no dancing and no orgy, so come on!" No need to ask twice - the pews were pushed aside and dance we did. Blasphemously and shamelessly. The mash-up tagged "Kids On Ohbijou" followed, playing mostly KoTV songs with trademark Ohbijou strings & harmonies backing fiendish beats. (Not so) "mystery guests" Holy F@ck finished things off with the pounding trance of their magic peddle tables. Getting to see them in such an intimate venue was pretty cool, and the sweet irony of yelling Holy F@ck in a church was not lost on many.

Take away: I hope local band mash-ups really take off and we get to hear more. Imagine the possibilities! - Broken Social Sloan. Think About Lunchmeat. The Tragically Final Fantasy (ok, that's bad). But seriously, local bands, if you're listening - I want more of this.

(Additional photos HERE, or view as slideshow HERE).


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