bentway moon

There's now a giant moon under the Gardiner Expressway in Toronto

The massive moon beneath The Bentway has officially risen. 

Hundreds of spectators gathered beneath the seven-metre-wide orb underneath the Gardiner Expressway last night for the launch of Museum of the Moon.

moon bentway torontoSuspended beneath the highway with cables, the orb is actually digitally printed with imagery from NASA, creating a perfect to-scale version of the moon. 

Now that it's up, you can view it all day, from morning to night, until September 15. 

moon bentway torontoIt's hard to tell before the sun set, but the orb is actually lit from within by a single light source, which becomes more apparent the darker it gets. 

moon bentway torontoJust like the moon that was on display at the Aga Khan Museum earlier this year, the sculpture is by British artist Luke Jerram, only  bigger this time.  

moon bentway torontoLast night's opening was accompanied by the option to sign up for wireless headphones, which tuned listeners in to a multi-channel soundtrack of eclectic sounds to supplement the moon viewing. 

moon bentway torontoThere were also moonlight meditation sessions being held by the Consciousness Explorers Club. You'll find sessions being held every day of the exhibit between 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. 

moon bentway torontoMake sure to check out the Moon Merge event on September 14, in celebration of what will be an epic full harvest moon

moon bentway toronto

Photos by

Fareen Karim


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Derelict military aircraft are sitting in a field just outside Toronto

Strangers helped a Toronto woman fix an old ripped photo of her dad as a teen

Toronto woman creates 3,000 self-care boxes for vulnerable women

Toronto mechanic makes a cart for a dog with amputated front legs

Humber Bay Park in Toronto spans two kilometres of the city's shoreline

Man recognizes himself in old photo of Children's Village at Ontario Place

Toronto LifeLabs location comes under fire for xenophobic sign

Buy nothing groups in Toronto are bringing neighbours together during the pandemic