banksy toronto

Toronto Banksy heist caught on video

Police are on the hunt for an art thief with expensive taste after at least one print was stolen from the newly-opened (and unauthorized) Banksy exhibit in Toronto's west end.

Security footage from the venue, released by Toronto Police late Thursday afternoon, shows exactly how the heist of Trolley Hunters — a print thought to be worth roughly $45,000 — went down.

In it, a person that police believe to be a man (though it really is hard to tell) is seen entering the gallery space at 213 Sterling Road, where The Art of Banksy is being hosted, around 5 p.m. on Sunday.

The thief, whose face is covered by a turtleneck, hat and glasses, hesitates for a few moments at the door before brazenly walking over to a wall and removing one of Banksy's satirical, anti-consumerist prints.

As quickly as he came in, the suspect exits the room with Banksy's work.

Police are describing this as "Break-and-Enter" investigation, meaning that whoever stole the painting was not likely an invited guest — though police did not say how he or she gained access to the space.

The 80-piece exhibition, curated by Banksy's former art agent Steve Lazarides, is said to be worth $35 million. One would think security would be tight, even ahead of yesterday's opening.

Those with any information about the suspect or removal of the painting are asked to contact the 11 Division Major Crime Unit at 416-808-1100 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS.

Lead photo by

Toronto Police


Latest Videos



Latest Videos


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Arts

A new Shrek musical is coming to Toronto this summer

One of Toronto's oldest buildings is transforming into a unique theatrical production

Someone in Toronto is transforming a plain street pole into a colourful LEGO tower

Toronto beach transformed with fun and interactive installations for Winter Stations

10 emerging Black creatives from Toronto that should be on your radar

Long-lost program returning to the TTC to bring a little joy to your commute

This new Toronto sculpture has technology to make you less depressed

Billy Bishop Airport is celebrating Toronto's hip hop culture with new artwork