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Best of Toronto

The Best Perogies in Toronto

Posted by Liora Ipsum / October 1, 2014

perogies torontoThe best perogies in Toronto are far superior to the mass-produced versions found in your local freezer aisle. Made from scratch, the Polish/Ukrainian staple is best had when fresh, filled with love, and pinched by hand.

At Toronto restaurants and deli counters, you'll find classic versions (potato and cheese, sauerkraut and mushrooms, or minced meat) in abundance, as well as some gourmet approaches that upgrade the humble comfort food with addition of truffles, smoked cheeses or pork belly.

Here are the best perogies in Toronto.

See also:

The best dumplings in Toronto
The top 10 Polish bakeries in Toronto
A guide to Polish Toronto

Cafe Polonez

Cafe Polonez

This Roncesvalles eatery is a favourite for four varieties of homestyle perogies sold six ($5.50) or 12 ($10) at a time. Served with sour cream and fried onions, choices include cheddar, cottage cheese, minced pork, and my favourite, an earthy mix of sauerkraut and mushrooms. More »

Czehoski

Czehoski

Settle in at this cozy Queen Street dining room for a couple pints and a plate of sweet potato and cheese-stuffed perogies. Priced at $20 for six, these handmade specimens are served on a bed of braised red cabbage with a cool side of creme fraiche for dipping. More »

The Saint

The Saint

This handsome tavern on Ossington offers pork belly and cheddar perogies ($11) as a starter for supper or as late-night snack on weekends. Served five to a plate, these buttery pan-fried pockets come with cabbage and herbed sour cream on the side. More »

Amber European

Amber European

Grandma’s hand pinched perogies ($8-$12) are boiled and topped with onions, bacon and fresh dill at this Bloor West Village restaurant. Available in the classic lineup of potato and cheese, ground beef, or sauerkraut and mushrooms, the Polish staples are joined by a Siberian variation, Plemeny ($12.50), stuffed with lamb. More »

Richmond Station

Richmond Station

Find comfort in the Financial District at this restaurant where handmade perogies get a reverential but refined riff. Here, potato and ramp perogies ($23) are presented over a swoosh of beet-horseradish puree with caramelized onions and earthy cinnamon cap mushrooms. More »

Chopin

Chopin

Served 10 at a time, the classic ruskie perogi ($11) filled with cheddar and mashed potato, is among the house favourites at this Polish restaurant on Roncesvalles. Other variations include a mix of cabbage and mushrooms or minced meat. More »

Beerbistro

Beerbistro

The humble perogi get a gourmet spin at this King East beer bar. The truffle perogies ($18) are handmade with oyster mushrooms and Mennonite sheep’s milk cheese filling before being finished in a sizzling pan with plenty of butter, onions and a dollop of creme fraiche. More »

Inter Steer

Inter Steer

Five types of perogies ($10-$12) are available at this European tavern on Roncy. Go traditional with pillows of cheese, sauerkraut or meat topped with caramelized onions and bacon bits. You can also get adventurous with deep-fried poutine or nacho-style perogies, or the dessert version ($7) with yogurt, muesli and berries. More »

Museum Tavern

Museum Tavern

This dapper destination across from the ROM offers a menu filled with modern takes on the old standards. When it comes to perogies ($13), the crimped dumplings are no exception, with a little extra oomph added by a truffled mushroom filling with lardons and finished with caramelized onions and sour cream. More »

Country Style Hungarian

Country Style Hungarian

This old-school Hungarian diner in the Annex is home to massive schnitzel dinners, though the perogies with sausage ($11) should not be overlooked. Lightly fried (more like tossed in butter), this plate is topped with a tangle of deeply caramelized onions and accompanied by a little pot of sour cream. More »

Natalie's Kitchen

Natalie's Kitchen

The Ukrainian deli counter in Etobicoke makes up batches of take-away ready varynikis for at home consumption or for catered events. The boiled dumplings are available with a variety of stuffing like the dairy free potatoes and onions, or with cheddar or sauerkraut. More »

European Delight

European Delight

This well-established, Euro-centric takeaway counter on the lower level of St. Lawrence Market serves slippery half moons stuffed with minced veal or creamy mashed potatoes and cheddar cheese. Offered at impressive value, a half dozen sells for just $2.50 while a dozen go for just $4. More »

Discussion

43 Comments

Chester / October 1, 2014 at 02:29 pm
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My mother in law makes bomb perogies blows things out of the water...Go Mother Russia!
Marina / October 1, 2014 at 02:40 pm
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Vatra Cheese & Deli in Etobicoke (3878 Bloor St. West)
Jeff / October 1, 2014 at 03:03 pm
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Anywhere that fry's their Perogies is automatically disqualified. And yes, my opinion is the one that matters.
Chris / October 1, 2014 at 03:28 pm
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I miss you Prague Deli / Prague Fine Food Emporium.

Lisa Marie is not a suitable replacement.
Noah Parker / October 1, 2014 at 03:48 pm
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Nothing touches The Saucy Pierogi https://www.facebook.com/TheSaucyPierogi

Right now they were only showing up as pop-ups all summer at pretty much any foodie event, but they'll have a brick and mortar later this year. Check em out! Nothing like it!
moira / October 1, 2014 at 04:10 pm
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$20 for 6 cheese and potato perogies is a joke, Czehoski.
Josh replying to a comment from moira / October 1, 2014 at 05:19 pm
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Don't forget Richmond Station - $23 for perogies is insane.
Tata / October 1, 2014 at 05:36 pm
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VATRA Cheese & Deli by far THE BEST perogies . And they are actually hand made. Real ! Authentic ! And priced well. Vatra 3878 Bloor Str. West
v79 / October 1, 2014 at 05:51 pm
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I'd love to hear Czehoski's explanation as to why their perogies are 4X the price of first place Cafe Polonez. Pretentiousness knows no bounds in this city.
liz / October 1, 2014 at 05:56 pm
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Jeff is right. Frying is a method of making substandard perogies more palatable, or as a method of reheating leftover boiled perogies. My baba never added bacon or meat to them, either. Caramelized onions and a bit of sour cream are all you need with some truly delicious perogies.
Terrace Take-Away / October 1, 2014 at 06:06 pm
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Best in Oakville - fresh homemade varenyky every Thursday - we are open Thurs, Sat & Sun
Jodi / October 1, 2014 at 06:39 pm
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Might sound strange but On Cue Billards at Jane & Annette has delicious homemade perogies...and good craft beer on draft!
indibindi / October 1, 2014 at 07:04 pm
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An unsuspecting location that makes the best Ukrainian perogies (verenyky) ever ever and for extremely reasonable prices!!!(I think it was $4 for half dozen and 8 for full) is a local pool hall/music venue near Jane and Annette called On Cue . All made from scratch and different fillings are available...really outstanding for the price and not to mention the pool tables are nicely maintained and only costs $5/ person to play! My fav pool hall by far in Toronto happens to have the best perogies!
trudie / October 1, 2014 at 07:14 pm
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anyone have thoughts / recommendations on ukranian / polish churches that sell perogies? I've had the ones from st volodymyr on bathurst, but can't tell if they're truly homemade.
Robert replying to a comment from indibindi / October 1, 2014 at 07:18 pm
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That was way to obvious. Pass.
Cbab / October 1, 2014 at 07:28 pm
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#6 or #12 hands down. I'm weary of comfort food dressed up to pad the bill. Perogies are simple comfort food. Keep 'em as is.
Mick replying to a comment from Terrace Take-Away / October 1, 2014 at 08:17 pm
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That's not in Toronto, fuck face.
Darlene Stimson / October 1, 2014 at 08:34 pm
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you missed a great deli in Bloor West Village that makes amazing perogies! Astra has the best for my money
Rob / October 1, 2014 at 08:44 pm
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I can't vouch for those who have been to On Cue, but RIGHT next door to the pool hall there's a banquet hall called Baby Point lounge where cute little Ukrainian ladies pump out the best pierogis outside of my Baba's kitchen (although she's 91 and is far too lazy to make them now).

I'd venture a guess that the ladies at Baby Point make them from scratch for On Cue?
pz replying to a comment from liz / October 1, 2014 at 10:09 pm
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lol, who in the world told you that?!
Thomas Greene III / October 1, 2014 at 10:46 pm
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#4...Amber in Bloor West village is the best. I went to another spot in Toronto that charges 12 dollars per perogie and they weren't as good.
#3am / October 1, 2014 at 11:30 pm
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Perogy Boys!!!!!!
With Smetana / October 2, 2014 at 12:09 am
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On Cue's Ukrainian varenyky are for real. They are home made in house, and the presentation is great.
Yummm / October 2, 2014 at 01:00 am
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I agree; any restaurant that fries its pierogi shouldn't be on the list. The new trendy places like to fry both pierogi and gnocchi, but that is just silly.
I think Polish ones are much better than Ukrainian, due to the thinner dough and the better variety of fillings. I am neither Polish, nor Ukrainian, so don't even think of accusing me of that bias.
Helder / October 2, 2014 at 08:32 am
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Umm alot of eastern europeans fry perogies. We usually fry them the day after a big celebration the left ovet perogies qre fried and eaten with breakfast. Mmmmm mmmmm
samantha / October 2, 2014 at 08:56 am
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My Teta (aunt) Iryna's perogies are the best in the world. If I can't get them I buy at Natalie's Kitchen.
Rick / October 2, 2014 at 10:08 am
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How about just go to Starskys and buy a bag of them and do em up your self? They have lots of different varieties - and actually, my polish buddies grandmother from the old country who make the best polish food ever - endorsed the homemade perogies sold here....Any they like $6-$7 a bag.... Who in the hell would pay $25++ for perogies is clearly out of their mind.
moira replying to a comment from Josh / October 2, 2014 at 12:36 pm
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Haha totally. Maybe these people don't realize you can buy a whole bag for $1.99.
Annette / October 2, 2014 at 03:39 pm
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I found http://www.deluxefrozenfood.ca, in Mississauga near hwy 427 off Dundas, when reading a review for Natalie's Kitchen a while ago. They are hand made by a Ukrainian lady whose son opened their storefront and production centre about 3 years ago. My new favourite...the potatoe with spinach and feta are absolutely inhaled by my grandkiddies. Smachnoho!
Jeff replying to a comment from Wannabe Hipster / October 2, 2014 at 09:25 pm
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Yes funny how I take a road bike in my shop take all of the components off of it, and I can charge more for it from suckers like you. Bike with fill gears and brakes $899.99, I take all the components off keep them for myself swap the rear tire for a cheap single speed and the price goes up to $1299.99. Cha Ching and I can still sell the components for more...
Suzie / October 2, 2014 at 09:30 pm
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Yes we pay more for food in restaurants. If I make fish tacos at home it costs about $10 for the whole family, go to a restaurant its $10+ per person. Pizza make it at home all the time, even if I buy the fresh dough from a bakery its about $4-$5 for a large, order it in or go out for pizza and its about $14 for the same size.

Where you're all really getting ripped off on is the Brunch Scene. Go out for brunch and many of you are paying the same prices you'd pay for dinner out for some eggs and a few sides. I do not need to start my day with a $20-$30 breakfast.

Don't even get me started on the prices of Pasta Y'all. Its just crazy to order Pasta or Pad Thai out. $2 a plate to make at home $10-$20 dollars in a restaurant.
read again, Suzie / October 3, 2014 at 01:53 am
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Suzie, no one is saying food in a restaurant should be priced the same as making it at home. People are just pointing out that trendy places sell exactly the same thing for up to three times the amount of more authentic restaurants, that's all.
Now do you get it?
Mmm perogies / October 3, 2014 at 04:49 am
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I live at jane and Annette and have walked past on cue so many times had no idea they served food, it looks shady all tucked in with the Scotiabank.. Definitely going to check it out.
Ciocia Grazyna replying to a comment from liz / October 3, 2014 at 12:11 pm
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Your baba may not have friend them, but boiled pierogi with caramelized onions are common across Polish kitchens.
Konrad / October 3, 2014 at 03:28 pm
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Agree with Noah - the Saucy Pierogi is on a whole new level..

The dough is satin soft, the fillings are unreal (braised beef shank, saurkraut+kimchi+polish wild mushrooms, kielbasa+carmelized onion+potato, pulled pork, jerk chicken.. list goes on) - and they are paired with sauces and sides which elevate these pierogies to another planet.

Hand made - and fried to order - You can catch them throughout the fall at the ROM every friday night.. Bricks and mortar location is in the works as well somewhere in West End toronto this winter.

http://www.saucypierogi.com/events.html
Matt Wood / October 3, 2014 at 04:18 pm
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You missed The Saucy Pierogie! Best Pierogie ever!
Paul / October 3, 2014 at 04:37 pm
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agree with everyone who expressed disappointment with Saucy Pierogi being excluded from this list. Some questionable, vanguard, choices, folks! Deli pierogies - seriously!? comparing some of your frontrunners to Saucy Pierogi is like comparing Kendrick Lamar to Afrika bambaataa.

Saucy Pierogi is on another level. My personal favourite is the potato cheddar pieorgi infused with fresh bacon bits and topped with a gruyere/lager cheese sauce. i could eat it every day, and pretty much have been considering TSP’s presence at some of Toronto's hottest out door festivals this year. Check out their full menu and a listing of upcoming events:

http://www.saucypierogi.com/
Sonja / October 3, 2014 at 04:55 pm
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I tried the saucy pierogi at roncesvalles polish fest- loved them!
s. / October 3, 2014 at 04:55 pm
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It is a huge oversight to leave out the saucey pierogi. A new take on a traditional dish, and simply put; they taste amazing.
Paul / October 3, 2014 at 04:56 pm
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Saucy Pierogi hands down. Some questionable, vanguard choices, folks. Deli pierogies - seriously!? Comparing some of your frontrunners to saucy pierogi is like comparing kendrick lamar to afrika bambaataa.

as for those of you who think buying a frozen bag from starsky's is comparable, i challenge you to come and talk to me once you've tried Saucy's cheddar potato pierogi infused with fresh bacon bits and topped with a lager/gruyere sauce...i could eat it every day, and pretty much have been considering Saucy Pierogi's presence at Toronto's hottest festivals this summer. check out their menu and upcoming events:

www.saucypierogi.com
Rawr / October 6, 2014 at 07:39 pm
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I don't know a single Euro that actually goes to a restaurant (or downtown lol) for perogies. Good luck convincing an immigrant family to pay $1/per when there are fantastic frozen options available.

Find the Russian/Polish grocer near you and ask them for "Grandma's Perogies". It's the best brand I've found, and they're even available at No Frills and Basics, I think.

Boil up a few dozen. Add some butter. Dip them in white vinegar (!) or soy sauce. So good.
lol / October 6, 2014 at 07:41 pm
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I hope I'm not the only one that's never going to Saucy Perogi after all of the shameless shilling in this thread. Try not posting 20 seconds apart next time, dorks.
Overly Sauced / October 8, 2014 at 12:20 pm
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Yes, the Saucy Overload has turned me off of going there, too. Never bombard a board like that for it makes you look foolish. Last time I saw that happen to this extent was about a meat pie place from Down Under.

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