omakase toronto

The Best Omakase in Toronto

The best omakase in Toronto leave your meals in the hands of the most discerning itamae. A traditional way to eat a chef-chosen selection of dishes, omakase—which means "leave it up to you" in Japanese, offer adventurous diners high quality fish in an innovative way. 

Here are the best omakase in Toronto. 


Yasu
1

Yasu

This high-end Harbord Village restaurant may be itty bitty, but that's part of what makes it the quintessential omakase experience. It's reservation-only here, and wait lists can be months in advance, but sometimes you can get lucky with a same-day spot if you call ahead at 3 p.m.

Sushi Kaji
2

Sushi Kaji

Kaji on the Queensway offers nothing short of quality. Helmed by longtime itamae, Chef Mitsuhiro Kaji, this omakase serves nothing but fresh fish, imported from Japan daily (fish is never kept over night), and a dried bonito soy sauce Chef Kaji makes from scratch.


Miku
3

Miku

Sitting right by the Harbourfront, this sprawling South Core restaurant has become a popular spot for upscale power lunches and special dinners. Known for their flame-seared sushi, Miku offers two options of kaiseki dinners with multiple chef-selected courses.

Japango
4

Japango

You'll have to order your omakase meal in advance, and a reservation is highly suggested, but the wait is worth it for a meal at this cozy little restaurant right in Toronto's burgeoning Little Tokyo 'hood. It can get a tad cramped in here, but hey, proximity to the sushi chefs is never a bad thing.


Skippa
5

Skippa

Intimate but still spacious, this restaurant in Harbord Village specializes in seasonal Japanese food. Skippa feels a bit more casual than your usual omakase, and Chef Ian Robinson—who trained under Chef Mitsuhiro Kaji—offers an affordable omakase based on market fish prices.


Zen Japanese Restaurant
6

Zen Japanese Restaurant

There aren't many omakase that offer lunch service, but this restaurant near Woodbine and Steeles gives you the option of a chef-selected midday meal. There's a variety of options here, from solely sushi to just sashimi, plus a pricier mix of both with apps and homemade dessert too.

Ja Bistro
7

Ja Bistro

Everyone knows the playful angler fish logo of this beloved Japanese spot in the Entertainment District. This omakase offers a chef's choice option of affordable classic sushi for lunch and at night, blowtorched selections instead.


Shoushin
8

Shoushin

The epitome of an upscale omakase, this sleek midtown restaurant run by chef-owner Jackie Lin requires guests to ditch the shoes and opt for slippers instead. Guests sit at an L-shaped counter to try a variety of omakase menus, with selections that change daily depending on the freshness of fish imported from Tokyo Bay.

Shunoko
9

Shunoko

If you've never been to Japan's famous Tsujiki Market, not to worry. This St. Clair restaurant imports much of its fish from the venerated market in Tokyo. Run by the same people behind the now-closed Sushi Nomi on Roncy, Shunoko focuses on seasonal fish, and Chef Jun Kim even makes his own umeboshi (pickled plums).

Lead photo by

Jesse Milns of Shoushin, to.masticator of Yasu, @urnotlauretta of Miku, @yyz_eeeeats of Zen Japanese

The Best Omakase in Toronto

Leaflet | © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap Improve this map

Join the conversation Load comments

The Best Omakase in Toronto

Leaflet | © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap Improve this map

Latest in Best of Toronto

The Best Kebabs in Toronto

The Best Pizza in Etobicoke

The Best Lasagna in Toronto

The Best Souvlaki and Gyros in Toronto

The Best Ethiopian Restaurants in Toronto

The Best Croissant in Toronto

The Best Poke Bowl in Toronto

The Best Cookies in Toronto