ontario nurses

Angry nurses in Ontario erect signs warning Doug Ford supporters to stay away

Ontario election season comes with all sorts of interesting lawn signs, and while most are placed by supporters of political parties, there are always some outliers.

Among the election signs not bearing a party candidate's name this year, several have popped up around the province, warning canvassers of the Ontario PC Party to stay the heck off their property.

Nurses and associations representing the profession have been among the most prominent critics of Doug Ford and his Ontario PC Party, a political grudge that boiled over outside of a recent leaders debate in midtown Toronto this week.

It's a sentiment echoed by signs appearing on the lawns of many nurses this election season, who are warning canvassers out trying to drum up support for the PCs to stay away, claiming that Ford and company have done great damage to health care in the province since taking office in 2018.

Nancy Halupa, a registered nurse in Ontario, has been vocal in her criticism of Ford's health care policies like Bill 124, 195, and 197, which have suppressed the wages and overridden collective agreements of nurses and the associations representing them

Halupa, who has a similar paper sign taped to her front door, tells blogTO that she put the warning to canvassers up because "she's sick of the lies."

"The PC party has been lying for four years and I'm done listening. It's my way of telling the canvassers (while hoping it gets back to the constituent) that their platform is NOT for the people. It's for rich people."

Halupa argues that "Doug Ford is not concerned about your health or your ability to get the proper care."

She claims that "He is concerned about brick and mortar," but adds that Ford's pledges to build "new hospitals won't fix the problem he has created."

A frustrated Halupa says she doesn't "want to waste one more second of my time listening to the PC rhetoric, and I hope the canvassers respect that."

If any canvassers decide not to heed the warning, Halupa says that she's "more than happy to let them know how I really feel. Loudly!"

Cathryn Hoy, President of the Ontario Nurses' Association (ONA) tells blogTO that the signs are a direct response to nurses' "experiences during four years of horrendous treatment and disrespect by the Ford government."

Hoy says that "Throughout their term in office, PC members have subjected nurses and health-care professionals to wage suppression that breaches their Charter rights, failed to protect them against an airborne virus, have overridden their collective agreements, stood by silently as their numbers dwindled and risked the care of patients and health of workers, and they have ignored the solutions of nurses for addressing the severe nursing shortage."

She states her frustration with how the Ford PC government "has also quietly privatized more and more of our health-care system without the public noticing," something the ONA has rallied against.

"This has put the health care of Ontarians at risk, due to the resulting nursing crisis. This party has lost any credibility it may have ever had with nurses and health-care professionals."

"What is needed is a government that steps up and works with ONA to take definitive action to preserve publicly funded and delivered health care, provided by appropriately staffed health-care facilities. Once and for all, for the long-term, the severe nursing shortage in this province must be fixed."

Lead photo by

Patricia Cockerham


Latest Videos



Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Invasive flower that can cause severe burns spotted near popular Toronto trail

Toronto police bust wild scam where moving companies held people's belongings for ransom

Toronto park won't be hosting fireworks for Canada Day and people have mixed feelings

55 photos from the 2022 Pride Parade in Toronto

Here's what the Toronto Pride Parade 2022 looked like in video

People are upset with Pride Toronto's new photography policy

Toronto street festival just changed its name and people aren't happy about it

Toronto politician accused of homophobic social media posts resigns from city council