gender identity ontario

Ontario government can't seem to make up its mind on gender identity legislation

The Ontario government is confusing many this week as it flips and flops on an anti-LGBTQ gender identity debate. 

Early this weekend, the Progressive-Conservatives passed a resolution to debate whether gender identity would be recognized by the party. The vote took place during the party's Toronto convention. It was introduced by Tanya Granic Allen, a former candidate to the party. 

At the time, the resolution stated that gender identity is a "liberal ideology" and "unscientific," suggesting a removal from Ontario public school curriculum. 

Opposition leaders and countless residents opposed the motion, crying out at the anti-LGBTQ and transphobic stance they said the party had taken. 

Then, this morning, Education Minister Lisa McLeod reversed course, saying the resolution is not binding and not "government policy," indicating that nothing had been finalized yet. 

Now, in an answer to reporters at a press conference, Premier Doug Ford says the debate will not happen.

He is exploring "every option" as leader of the party to prevent the resolution from moving forward, Ford told reporters. 

The controversial debate follows what many called an anti-LGBTQ policy of removing gender identity and same-sex teachings from the sexual education curriculum. 

The resolution would have allowed for debate of gender identity recognition at next year's party gathering, so a final decision is yet to come. 

Lead photo by

Doug Ford


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