etc subway accessibility

TTC to update subway stations to make them more accessible

While the TTC tests out new pilot projects and indulges in self-congratulatory behaviour, a more pressing matter has begun to take precedence: the accessibility of its services.

The TTC announced today that it will take action to shorten the gaps between subway cars and platforms by retrofitting 62 stations that have been cited for improvements.

The retrofitting will include using rubber fillings along platforms and, in some cases, building new ramps. Some stations will only require minor work while others will need major construction that could cause station closures.

The move comes as a welcome relief to many riders, with Advisory Committee on Accessible Transit chair Debbie Gillespie calling it a "godsend" for those who have mobility issues or rely on mobility devices and aids to maneuver the transit system.

The plan falls under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act that was introduced in 2005 and mandates Ontario businesses to work to improve accessibility across the province by 2025.

The transit giant has also ordered a new batch of 60 WheelTrans buses in addition to its fully accessible incoming fleet of new buses.

Construction could begin as early as next year starting with Davisville, St. Clair, Union, and Dundas stations before moving on to the more complex retrofitting required at other stations in 2020.

Lead photo by

Nicoli OZ Mathews


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