ben mcnally toronto

One of Toronto's favourite bookstores is closing and people are devastated

Toronto's community of bookworms and literature-lovers are taking to social media to grieve the fact that Ben McNally Books is closing.

The Bay Street bookstore—which has been a well-respected hub for the lit community for over a decade—announced that it will be closing its doors forever sometime next year. 

Opened by longtime book-aficionado Ben McNally in 2007, the 2,500-square-foot store, with its wood-paneled interior, has been home to countless book readings and releases. 

According to an interview with the Globe and Mail, the store's lease ends at the end of August 2020. 

After that, the property owner, Dream Office Management, has plans to revamp the current space into an open-air pathway that will run between Richmond and Temperance Streets. 

Publishers and hobbyist readers alike have taken to Twitter to mourn the loss of yet another (and another) beloved bookstore, especially in the Financial District, where book purveyors are few and far between. 

Aside from having an incredibly beautiful interior, the space has a very special place for romantic book lovers. 

People have even taken a knee between the shelves and proposed to their bookish others.

While McNally has said that he has hopes of re-opening the shop eventually, there are no plans yet as to where or when. 

Lead photo by

Ben McNally Books


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