dominion voting systems

Trump blames Toronto tech company for alleged voting fraud

In the middle of all of U.S. President Donald Trump's allegations of voter fraud in the federal election earlier this month is an unlikely tech company founded in Toronto.

Dominion Voting Systems provides electronic hardware and programming for elections, which was used in 28 states, including ones that turned out to be key deciders, such as Georgia and Nevada.

He also retweeted a TV interview with election security expert Russ Ramsland, who said that private companies like Dominion do not have to meet any national security standards, that systems are easy to hack and that votes are easy to change in such software.

Fox News also predictably corroborated Trump's stance with a broadcast last week that talked about claims of potential glitches with Dominion systems, as well as forthcoming audits, a segment of which Trump also retweeted.

"Dominion Voting Systems categorically denies false assertions about vote switching and software issues with our voting system," reads a statement in all caps at the top of Dominion's site. 

It goes on to clarify that claims such as "supercomputer" fraud conspiracies, software glitches, vote deletion/switching assertions, last-minute software updates and company partisanship and more are all untrue.

A tweet from Elections Canada earlier this week stating that federal elections north of the border are counted by hand and not virtually with tech from companies like Dominion only served to add fuel to the fire, with Trump retweeting it, adding "THIS SAYS IT ALL!"

A representative from the Parliamentary agency told the CBC that the tweet was only in response to a flurry of questions about automated tabulation in Canada following the drama in the U.S. "It shouldn't be construed as anything other than that," they told the news outlet.

Lead photo by

@gmalhotra


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