climate change news

Toronto startup wants to plant a billion trees with drones

While large corporations exploit the earth, our planet burns and civilians demand action, one Toronto startup is pursuing an innovative way to combat climate change.

Flash Forest, a venture that was founded last spring and emerged on Kickstarter in December, wants to use drones to plant germinating tree seeds in order to offset our collective carbon footprint and remediate our destructive habits.

The automated drones will fire nutrient-packed pods into the soil at an optimal depth for growth. The company estimates that a single drone could plant up to 20,000 trees a day — ten times the speed of a human tree planter, without negative factors like water waste and potential for injury.

This could amount to one billion trees planted by 2028.

The Flash Forest crowdfunding page outlines the research behind the project, as well as the technical specs, timeline and other in-depth information.

The primary goals include not only reforestation in the face of deforestation, but increasing biodiversity by rebuilding degraded ecosystems with a variety of tree species and soil-enriching ingredients.

The initiative has already exceeded its initial goal of $10,000 CAD by nearly $60,000, and is now aiming for a stretch goal of $100,000 by January 19.

The Flash Forest team has so far planted 3,100 seed pods around Southern Ontario in a test phase and is hoping to bring their technology internationally and take at least one major form of climate action before it's too late.

Lead photo by

@b.m.a.n.


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