thanksgiving toronto

Toronto says this Thanksgiving will be memorable but one you'll want to forget

At their press conference on Friday, Toronto Mayor John Tory and Medical Officer of Health Eileen de Villa echoed the thoughts of many of us as a number of major new restrictions were thrust upon the city moving into the Thanksgiving long weekend: "This will be a Thanksgiving most of us will always remember, and one we'd probably rather forget."

Toronto, along with Peel and Ottawa, is now subject to additional rules and business closures reminiscent of Stage 2 of lockdown, including the shuttering of gyms, movie theatres, museum exhibits, casinos, and the indoor dining areas of restaurants and bars.

Those who live within the bounds of the three hotspot regions have also been asked not to venture outside of the city, and to likewise limit trips out of the house in general to things like grocery shopping and work when work is not possible from home.

All of this comes just before a holiday for which people customarily visit with and enjoy the company of family — something officials have advised against, albeit very in very confusing terms.

"You are safest spending Thanksgiving only with the people you live with in your home," de Villa reiterated today before delivering the delicious one-liner that serves as the headline of this article.

And for those of us who live alone in one of the dreaded infected zones? "If at all possible, connect virtually rather than in-person."

Both she and Tory lauded Premier Doug Ford's decisions today to lock down the city further, with Tory acknowledging the difficulties these new measures mean for small businesses and the population at large amid what he aptly deems an "ongoing nightmare."

In lieu of a big family dinner for Thanksgiving this year, one great option is to support struggling local restaurants by ordering takeout or delivery feast for you and your housemates.

Lead photo by

David Dang


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