broadview hotel toronto

Broadview Hotel in Toronto in fight with employees over COVID-19 layoffs

Toronto's Broadview Hotel is set to enter talks with the union representing its employees after staff members alleged management has been using the COVID-19 pandemic as an excuse to dismantle labour organizing efforts. 

Sarah Tauriello, who has worked at the hotel as a server for three years, said in an email to blogTO that when the city announced Phase 2 staff "became suspicious that the company was using the reopening as a strategy to get rid of the union."

Tauriello alleges management did not respect seniority when hiring back a "skeleton crew" after the hotel temporarily closed in March.

One server who was key to the labour effort was not brought back, which seemed to be a deliberate choice by the higher-ups, Tauriello alleges. 

After rebuffing requests for a negotiation date, Tauriello claims management proposed a meeting that would take place after employees on a six-month recall list would be terminated permanently. 

A petition was created last week and workers threatened to take to the picket lines, organizing group Broadview United said in an Instagram post that workers "now get to keep our temporary layoff status until after negotiations have concluded." 

A conciliator has now been appointed by the province's Ministry of Labour to force the company to the bargaining table.

Broadview Hotel has not returned blogTO's request for comment. 

Lead photo by

Hector Vasquez


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Derelict military aircraft are sitting in a field just outside Toronto

Strangers helped a Toronto woman fix an old ripped photo of her dad as a teen

Toronto woman creates 3,000 self-care boxes for vulnerable women

Toronto mechanic makes a cart for a dog with amputated front legs

Humber Bay Park in Toronto spans two kilometres of the city's shoreline

Man recognizes himself in old photo of Children's Village at Ontario Place

Toronto LifeLabs location comes under fire for xenophobic sign

Buy nothing groups in Toronto are bringing neighbours together during the pandemic