samuel opoku toronto

This is what people are saying about the arrest of the man dumping feces in Toronto

People of Toronto woke up feeling a little safer now that the feces thrower has been caught by Toronto police.

As of 6 p.m. yesterday, Samuel Opoku, 23, of Toronto, was arrested and charged with five counts of assault with a weapon and five counts of mischief interfere with property.

This comes after a series of incidents over the last five days where unsuspecting victims had buckets of feces dumped on them on two separate university campuses.

The city followed the story closely, probably because the thought of being dumped on by a bucket of feces is well-horrifying, and because this has truly been one of those head scratching stories. 

A lot of people have shared how relieved they're feeling now that they don't have to worry about being the next victim of the feces thrower.

For others, the incidents have opened their eyes to how weird things can get in this city, and in university. 

You never know when things will take a turn like this.

Many people are thinking that the incidents might be a result of someone struggling with mental health issues.

A parody account which dubbed the the alleged perpetrator of the attacks the "peepeepoopoo man" made sure to get the last word after the news of the arrest broke. 

Opoku is scheduled to appear in court at 60 Queen Street West, courtroom 101, today at 10 a.m.

Lead photo by

Toronto Police


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