April Fools 2019

The 10 best April Fools' Day pranks in Toronto this year

It's getting harder and harder for brands to trick the masses on April Fools' Day as people get wise to how much everyone lies on the internet for attention.

The days of headline-making pranks from tech juggernauts are over — I mean, the newsiest trick this April 1 was Tom Brady joining Twitter to announce his own retirement.

Still, many local institutions, continue to inspire chuckles around Toronto with their gags, and, April Fools' fatigue notwithstanding, they're doing an excellent job of it.

Did you hear the one about the TTC subway going all night?

Here are some of the funniest April Fools' Day pranks we've seen for 2019 so far.  

Toronto Public Library's cat rental service

TPL teased us all by introducing "Purrfect Pals" — a library program that, if it weren't fake, would allow people to check out cats as reading companions with their library cards.

Toronto's first dog-exclusive condominium

Condos.ca went big with the creative for their April Fools' Day prank: A new dog-centric condo complex in Yorkville called "Le Chien." Check out the fake building's website. It's impressive.

Foodora's delivery dogs

Also in dogs, Foodora announced this morning that it would soon be launching a feature in which customers could get their food delivered by a "team of highly-trained doggos."

No Frills gets a new logo (and it isn't a dog or cat)

Canada's most interesting grocery store unveiled a logo inspired by its slogan, "won't be beat." The logo is a beet. Get it? 

University of Toronto Press forges partnership with Texas

UTP, Canada's leading publisher of scholarly works, announced in a press release on Monday morning that it would be merging with University of Texas Press and rebranding as "Giddy Up."

Check out our new logo, y’all! Given the recent confusion regarding the @UTPRESS social media accounts, the University of Texas Press and the University of Toronto press are pleased to announce the merging of their operations. . Due to immigration concerns, both presses agreed that it would be easier for the Texans to move north. And so, in accordance with their Canadian values, Toronto staff are busy practicing their apologies and shuffling office supplies to make room for their new southern desk mates. At the time of this release, the Canadians admitted they do have questions about rumours of open-toed cowboy boots. . The new logo for the combined publishers – now under the banner “Giddy UP” – incorporates Canada’s national sport of hockey with the well-known bovine mascot of the University of Texas at Austin. Both teams are receiving training in colloquialisms such as how to use “y’all” and “eh” appropriately. . #GiddyUP #Texas @utexaspress #ReadUP #movingtoCanada #Canadabound #Toronto

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Chalet sauce-flavoured ice cream

I'm honestly kind of annoyed that this one isn't real.

Comedy Barn

One of Toronto's best comedy venues finally got its entire sign lit after 10 years of incongruency near Ossington and Bloor, but an extra "N" seems to have found its way into the mix.

Doug McNish

Toronto chef and vegan cookbook author Doug McNish, the man behind some of this city's most-popular meat-free restaurants, announced this morning that after 15 years of abstaining from meat he was ready to give up veganism. Good one, Chef.

I’m sad to say that after 15 + years of being vegan, authoring 4 books, helping to run multiple vegan food business, winning awards and more, I am no longer vegan 😢😢😢 - - I have been recently inspired by all of the Vegan YouTube personalities that listened to their true selves and did what they thought was best for them, and their health 🙌🙌🙌 - - It was a tough decision and I’ve had many sleepless nights, but I’ve had to listen to my body and do what is right for me 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻 - - I’m sorry to anyone I’ve let down, I know there will be some people who question my choices, all I ask is that you listen to me and understand 🤔🤔🤔 - - #aprilfools #haha #vegan4life #fortheaninals #veganpranks

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Nutrition-filled Greenhouse gases

Greenhouse Juice Co., ever the pranksters, came up with the idea of cold-pressing nutrients into huffable air to sell "molecular superfoods at their most bioavailable." I feel like this could be an actual thing in six months. 

Cabbagetown to become Spinachtown

Last but far from least we have the Cabbagetown BIA with an announcement about changing its name to "Spinachtown." Not only will this help differentiate the east Toronto neighbourhood from Cabbagetown in Atlanta, they contend, but the leafy green better reflects the healthy lifestyles of local residents.

Our marketing department is THRILLED to announce the renaming of Toronto's Cabbagetown to SPINACHTOWN. After an extensive review process including community led consultation meetings over the last 18 months, it was decided by a City of Toronto endorsed public vote held on March 29th the new name was needed for reasons including: 1) Continued efforts to distance ourselves from Cabbagetown, Atlanta have failed and tourists often arrive in Cabbagetown, Toronto confused as to why they are in Canada. 2) As more and more locals shift to healthier eating the more nutritious leafy green vegetable, spinach, reflects more closely our diets. 3) The term "Cabbagetown" was originally a derogatory or "negative" title when used first to describe our area when Irish immigrants grew cabbages in their front yard. 4) Local restaurants have struggled to "celebrate" the cabbage in their menu line ups. It is believed spinach will be a more desirable menu item. The full re branding will be phased in over the next six months. For more information, please call Spinachtown BIA Executive Director Stephen-Thomas Maciejowski at 416-921-0857.

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Lead photo by

Toronto Public Library


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