free presto cards toronto

Scotiabank is giving away thousands of free Presto cards in Toronto

Remember when a huge Canadian bank took over the ACC and changed its name? You should. It happened less than three months ago.

The Scotiabank Arena, home to the Raptors and Maple Leafs, has yet to be formally christened as a sporting venue, as Scotiabank's naming rights only came into effect on July 1.

This will change in October when the Toronto Maple Leafs kick off their season with a home opener against the Montreal Canadiens.

To celebrate the venue's inaugural NHL season (like, with the new name), Scotiabank is giving away free, pre-loaded PRESTO cards out to the people of Toronto. A lot of them.

Then, on October 17, they'll be doing it again when the Cleveland Cavaliers take on the Toronto Raptors at home.

"The start of the season is an exciting time for all of Toronto and we want to get fans to Scotiabank Arena and Maple Leaf Square to cheer for their Maple Leafs and Raptors," reads their website.

"We will be giving away FREE pre-loaded PRESTO cards starting at 4 p.m. on both days and will continue until we run out."

The cards will be available at select TTC and GO stations across the city on October 3 and 17. Cards picked up from a TTC station will be pre-loaded with $6, while those obtained at the GO will have $8.

Spadina, College, Kipling, Finch, Eglinton, Don Mills and Kennedy Stations will all have 1,000 cards to give away, while the Oakville, Mimico, Pickering and Scarborough GO stations will have 750 cards each.

Go sports!

Lead photo by

PRESTO Card


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