don valley toronto

Toronto announces plans for super park in Don Valley

Toronto's Don Valley is undeniably beautiful, even when you're stuck in traffic on the DVP. But, some think the ravine is rather underused, especially since it runs right through the heart of the city.

That's why the city, along with Evergreen Canada, are working to create a massive "super park" stretching from the Evergreen Brick Works in the north all the way to Lake Ontario.

Earlier today, John Tory announced a group of private donors who are helping the Don River Valley Park project to fruition.

don valley toronto

"Toronto was built around its ravines. They give the city a unique identity that has defined how our city has grown. This project allows us to celebrate our ravines, talk about the important role they play for our residents, our resilience and our quality of life," said Mayor Tory in a news release.

"With the help of private donors, we will continue to make improvements to the Lower Don Valley, like new way-finding signage and entry points that will help residents access and navigate this park."

The Lower Don Trail will re-open in the spring with new features, including better wayfinding signage as well as a new Pottery Road Bridge and Belleville Underpass.

As CBC reports, the city has already spent $18 million on this parkland since 2012. Once it gets its official park designation, it'll be the second biggest park in the city.

Lead photo by David Dang via the blogTO Flickr pool.


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