Indigenous street signs toronto

New Toronto street signs give a nod to city's history

You might notice some new street signs cropping up on some pretty major roads around Toronto. That's because the Dupont by the Castle Business Improvement Area is partnering with the Ogimaa Mikana Project to highlight the area's Indigenous history.

"The Ogimaa Mikana Project is an effort to restore Anishinaabemowin place names to the streets, avenues, roads, paths and trails," reads a note on the Ogimaa Mikana project website. The goal, the site continues, involves "transforming a landscape that often obscures or makes invisible the presence of Indigenous peoples."


As CBC News reports, activists Hayden King and Susan Blight started the Ogimaa Mikana project three years ago by placing stickers with Indigenous place names on Toronto street signs.

Now, as CBC notes, four intersections in the city feature Anishinaabemowin places names, including Spadina, or Ishpadinaa.

Photo by @Hayden_King.


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