48 Power Condo

Monster condo complex planned for Corktown

Toronto may be obsessed with building soaring towers, but there's more than one way to develop a huge condo complex. Case in point: Great Gulf's latest plans for its site at Adelaide and Power streets is a sprawling complex that reaches 22-storeys high.

48 Power Condo

That's not a particularly tall building these days, though the projected number of units here comes in at a whopping 532. Originally much smaller in stature, the developer has dramatically increased the scale of this project after securing all of the properties on the block.

48 Power Condo

Located at the end of the Richmond exit from the southbound DVP, the site is prime for redevelopment. Plans call for retail and restaurant space at grade, which would certainly work well here. The renderings also show the creation of public space beside Orphan's Glen, though it's not yet clear whether this will be part of the final plans.

48 Power Condo

In fact, it's not yet clear whether any of this will come to pass in the form of CORE Architects' designs. While the height is clipped at 22-storeys, the size of the project is subject to review by city and could change if the scale is deemed too great.

There's little doubt that this area could benefit from the injection of life that a development like this promises, but it remains to be seen if the scale is too ambitious.

What do you think of the designs? Let us know in the comments.


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