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Computer Recycling Drop-off

That's the end of an LPT cable looking you in the face, and it's a fading technology.

Do you have an extremely old Pentium II 400MHz tower sitting in the basement/attic/storage room taking up space that would otherwise be used to store other things (like your old Pentium III 700MHz machine)? Why not get rid of both of them forever, and at the same time avoid sending them to local landfill or shipping them to China for recycling?

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From December 18th - 23rd, Toronto-based refurbisher, recycler, and IT service provider Computation is offering the general public an opportunity to get rid of old, defunct computers and parts in an environmentally conscious and privacy-ensured way.

How do they do this? I spoke with Dennis Maslo of Computation, who shed some light on the process.

Stuff that's isn't ancient will be refurbished for resale or donation to local not-for-profits and charities. Older or irrepairable items are dismantled into smaller component pieces that are further separated into material streams (aluminum goes here, copper there, this plastic goes here, etc). The use of recylcing and smelting allow us to incorporate much of the materials back into usable form without having to resort to much dirtier processes like landfill or incineration.

Drop-off your unwanted computer equipment for recycling at their Toronto facility:
2444 Bloor St. West (entrance at rear)
10:00am - 7:00pm, Monday - Friday
10:00am - 6:00pm on weekends.

For larger quantities, organizations, businesses, special requirements, or more information please contact Dennis Maslo at 416.629.5667

(recycle PC image: computation.to)


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