dundas peak open

Epic lookout spot near Toronto is now open to the public

Dundas Peak is back open to visitors after months of closure — but by reservation only

The epic lookout in Hamilton, along with other areas of the Spencer Gorge Conservation Area, reopened this past Saturday after being off-limits during the pandemic. 

The Hamilton Conservation Authority (HCA) announced their plans to open up Dundas Peak and Webster's Falls earlier this month. 

The new mandatory reservation system was been implemented due the "overwhelming popularity" of the popular fall destination. It'll also help to manage the numbers of visitors for physical distancing. 

All visitors, including HCA passholders, are now required to make an advance parking reservation seven days a week until November 15. After that, it's unclear what the policy will be. 

Visitors can make reservations up to a week prior to their visit. Reservations are made in two-hour blocks and start at 9 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m. 

Arrival times are staggered in 15 minute intervals, with 15 reservable spots per time slot. 

The reservation is $10, plus another $10 per vehicle, and $5 per person. Admission is free for kids five and under. 

When booking online, you'll have to create an account, reserve a time slot, indicate how many people are in your party, and provide your license plate. 

The hike to Dundas Peak includes a glimpse of Tew Falls, which sits at the beginning of the 1.8-kilometre loop trail. That experience takes hikers along the Niagara Escarpment from the falls to Dundas Peak, with views of Dundas and Hamilton. 

Webster Falls is its own two-hour hike, which grants a view of the 22-metre waterfall that includes a trek across the cobblestone bridge over Spencer Creek and the Dobson-McKee lookout. 

A reservation to Dundas Peak doesn't grant you entry to Webster Falls, and vice versa, but either rezo can get you admission to the Christie Lake Conservation Area at no extra cost. 

Make sure to read the safety rules before hitting up Spencer Gorge Conservation Area, and please, for god's sake, don't litter.

Lead photo by

@empaqueyvamos


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Travel

This historic log chute in Ontario is the last of its kind

There's a magical trail covered in holiday lights near Toronto

This farm in Ontario has trail rides and Ojibwe spirit horses

30 photos of fall colours in Ontario you won't believe are real

These animal sanctuaries near Toronto let you play with pigs and take them for a walk

Popular farm near Toronto closes its pumpkin patch for the first time in 30 years

Glen Oro Farm in Ontario comes with horseback rides and overnight glamping

You can stay in a floating geodesic dome near Toronto