geotaggers atlas toronto

New map tracks the most interesting places in Toronto

Digital cartographer Eric Fischer first released his Geotaggers' World Atlas back in 2010. Using geotagged information on Flickr, the project sought to highlight the places that people took the most photographs in cities around the world. From there, one might argue what the most interesting locations in a given city are based on the frequency with which they've been photographed.

Now, five years later, Fischer has done a massive update to the project, which adds loads of additional information to the first maps he produced in the series. The new maps are visually stunning documents layered with hints at how we use and appreciate cities.

"A cluster of geotagged photos is a good indicator of the interestingness of a place because it signifies that people went there in the first place, saw something worth taking a picture of, and put the extra effort into posting it online for others to appreciate," Fischer explains.

"And a sequence of photos along a route is even more significant, because it indicates that someone sustained their interest over distance and time rather than taking one picture and turning back."

You could make an argument that the inevitable tourist factor challenges Fischer's interestingness theory, but if you take the term literally -- as in those places that attract that most photographic interest -- then you have what might be thought of as a gravitational portrait of Toronto, one which highlights the places that have the most pull.

Use the map below to view the entire Geotaggers' Atlas of the World.


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