cumberland square toronto

Three massive towers planned for Yonge and Bloor

After multiple botched plans to develop the northwest corner of Bloor and Yonge, a new rezoning application has been submitted for the project known as Cumberland Square

It's been 15 years since plans were first submitted to redevelop the L-shaped site which sits at the northwest corner of Bloor and Yonge, and runs along the south side of Cumberland to Bay Street.

cumberland square toronto

KingSett Capital has sumitted a rezoning application for the Cumberland Terrace site. Rendering by Giannone Petricone Associates via City of Toronto.

This newest proposal from KingSett Capital, made through a limited partnership via Bloor CT Acquisition LP and designed by Giannone Petricone Associates, suggests adding three towers—at 50, 66, and 69 storeys—and a public square. 

The revitalization of the site, which has flip-flopped under different designers between adding one tower, then two, hopes to revitalize the site of the aging three-level Cumberland Terrace by adding a 50- and 66-storey building west of the square, and a 69-storey tower to the east.

Past plans have included a failed consolidation of different properties in the Yorkville area, like Cumberland Square, 2 Bloor, the Holt Renfrew Centre, and 33 Yorkville to better co-ordinate future developments.

There was even an international design competition held jointly by KingSett and Morguard to see how to best redevelop the Yonge and Bloor block spanning from Bloor to just north of Cumberland, but that, too, went nowhere. 

KingSett, who acquired both Cumberland Terrace and the adjoining 34-storey tower at 2 Bloor St. West in 2015, will be keeping the latter pretty much the same structurally, but with improved retail space on the first three floors and connections to the future public square.

Their plans to take Cumberland Terrace—the old school Toronto shopping mall which was built in 1974 and today houses a number of empty storefronts and a sad little food court—and turn it into Cumberland Square will take up about 31 per cent of the site. 

cumberland square toronto

Cumberland Square is a plaza being proposed to replace Cumberland Terrance. Rendering by Giannone Petricone Associates via City of Toronto.

Designed by Janet Rosenberg + Studio, the property may eventually e transformed into a plaza and gathering space equipped with a reflecting pool, something called a 'ghost house,' and a transparent canopy decked out with lights running between the east and west towers.

Underground, the revitalized plaza will feature connections via the PATH to the Bay subway station and surrounding buildings like the Holt Renfrew Centre. 

As for the buildings, both condos to the west of Cumberland Square will include car elevators, bike storage, and office spaces from the sixth floor to the eighth. 

The ninth floor will act as the main 'sky lobby,' while one floor above, the indoor amenities will face a rooftop terrace that links both western towers together.

To the east, on the other side of the plaza, the tallest building will feature retail space on its bottom two floors. The second floor will also have a large outdoor patio area, with condo suites starting on the fifth floor, and on the 45th floor, an outdoor pool. 

Cumberland Square could be a welcome addition to the hodge-podge of the many—some unwelcome—construction projects in and around the Yorkville area, but whether or not residents really end up getting a public space with their condos has yet to be seen. 

Lead photo by

Giannone Petricone Associates via City of Toronto.


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Real Estate

House of the week: 38 Farnham Avenue

These are the best Toronto neighbourhoods for first-time home buyers

Sold! Modern Toronto home goes for $2.5 million

Airbnb is causing higher rents and house prices in Toronto

Ontario government to allow landlords to increase rent by highest amount since 2013

Condo of the week: 60 Bathurst Street

Toronto overtakes Vancouver for most expensive two bedroom rentals

Rental of the week: 38 Church Street