ryding regency meat packers

Toronto activists want Ryding-Regency Meat Packers closed permanently after E. coli recall

Ryding-Regency Meat Packers is making headlines once again this week — not for getting smoke bombed by vegan protesters, but for being the subject of a nationwide recall involving more than 100 beef products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced the recall on Tuesday, stating that raw beef and raw veal products from the Toronto slaughterhouse were being pulled from the marketplace due to possible E. coli contamination.

"Food service establishments, retailers, distributors and manufacturers should not serve, use, or sell the recalled products described below," reads the recall notice, which lists off such items as veal loins and boneless beef bottom butt.

No illnesses associated with the consumption of the recalled products have been reported to date, but the CFIA is continuing to conduct a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products.

The federal government agency announced in mid-September that it had suspended the facility's license "for non-compliances related to control measures."

This was good news for local animal rights activists, who've been trying to get the slaughterhouse shut down for years after several horiffic instances of animal cruelty were caught on camera inside the facility.

When the suspension was announced, Toronto Cow Save called upon the CFIA to tell the public why.

The organization issued another statement today after the recall was issued, asking that Ryding-Regency be shut down permanently in light of the E. coli revelation.

"This is indefensible. We're hearing the e-coli contaminated flesh was sent out in May 2019, yet the e-coli alert is October 2019," said Toronto animal rights activist Jenny McQueen in a statement. "Is it possible someone has died from this? Have people become seriously ill?"

"The public has a right to know," continued McQueen.

"What we do know is that the slaughter industry is out of control, that profit trumps safety, animals are suffering egregious cruelty, and humans are at risk too."

Lead photo by

Fareen Karim


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