ttc subway

People are now venturing into Toronto's subway tunnels to film Tiktok videos

Whether it's taking selfies or lying down in the middle of train tracks, jumping off railway bridges or in other ways getting far too close to moving transit vehicles, people seem to be happy to go to great (and extremely idiotic) lengths these days for a cheap thrill or, worse, for the sake of social media content.

The latest trend appears to be exploring Toronto's subway tunnels — and no, not just the cool and creepy abandoned sites, but locations that are still very much in active daily use.

One recent TikTok video in particular that has garnered a ton of backlash shows various cuts of young people in clearly restricted areas cavalierly walking along the subway rails, wandering far down the momentarily empty tunnels and standing within feet of moving trains.

Though the original video and the account it was posted from has been deleted since all of the attention — which included a flurry of hate after being reposted on Instagram — the TTC has confirmed that Transit Enforcement is looking into the problem, as well as similar incidents documented on YouTube and other platforms.

A spokesperson for the commission called the acts "ridiculously irresponsible, dangerous, reckless and illegal" after being alerted to the video on Twitter, adding that the TTC is investigating, although the recent deletion of the original account makes it difficult.

These types of feats are in spite regular warnings from agencies like Metrolinx, which has in numerous PSAs had to implore residents to stop using train lines as hot sites for selfies, dance videos and the like, and also to stay away from their bridges, as tempting as it may be to use them to jump into the water below on a hot summer day.

Incidents of close calls with high speed trains have been so common in recent months that police in the GTA have had to further secure certain areas and step up enforcement and public education, issuing $5,000 trespassing tickets when necessary; a punishment that Metrolinx has says is "nothing in comparison to potentially paying the ultimate price" of losing your life.

"The increase in trespassing incidents this year is very concerning," reads a post from the regional transportation body.

 "Whether people are chasing 'likes' by taking photos on the tracks, or thrill-seeking on railway bridges, it's a bad idea. I'm sure the 2,100 North Americans who were killed or seriously injured in rail incidents last year would say the same thing: don't risk it."

Lead photo by

@pixelatd


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