perseid meteor

This is how to watch the Perseid meteor shower from Toronto during its peak this week

The Perseid meteor shower is considered to be the most spectacular of the year thanks to its "very fast and bright meteors," according to NASA, and Toronto residents will be able to catch a glimpse of the phenomenon during its peak later this week. 

The Perseid meteor shower is visible in the Northern Hemisphere every year from mid-July to the end of August, but its expected to reach its peak on the the night of Aug. 11 and 12 this year. 

"Perseids frequently leave long 'wakes' of light and colour behind them as they streak through Earth's atmosphere," according to NASA. 

"The Perseids are one of the most plentiful showers (50-100 meteors seen per hour) and occur with warm summer nighttime weather, allowing sky watchers to easily view them."

Perseids are also reportedly known for their fireballs, according to the space agency, which are larger explosions of light and colour that tend to persist longer than an average meteor streak. 

On top of all this, they're known to travel incredibly fast — at a speed of about 59 km per second. 

The Canadian Space Agency says anyone interested in viewing the meteor shower on Tuesday night should look up at the sky between moonset and dawn to see the most amount of meteors possible.

The agency also recommends heading away from city lights in search of dark skies in the countryside in order to find the best possible view.

Lying down on a reclining chair or blanket and using a flashlight with a red filter over the bulb will also reportedly help with meteor hunting, as observing the stars lying down allows you to see more and using white light could affect your night vision.

"Comet 109P/Swift–Tuttle causes this remarkable phenomenon. It orbits the sun, leaving a trail of dust and gravel in its path," says the Canadian Space Agency of what causes the Perseids.

"Every summer, the Earth crosses the comet's orbital path and passes through its trail of debris. That debris becomes meteors as it disintegrates in our atmosphere and generates impressive flashes of light!"

Lead photo by

NASA JPL


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

5 subway stations are shutting down on the TTC this weekend

Here's how much you can be fined for violating Ontario's vaccine passport rules

Toronto's most famous park has 12 banana plants and some are bearing fruit right now

Transit union boss alleges TTC coverup of near miss subway incident

Toronto couple helps baby squirrels abandoned on their lawn survive

Toronto Police say people shouldn't call 911 to report unvaccinated jerks

New research study will finally explain how people pronounce Toronto

Guinness certifies longest enclosed pedestrian bridge in the world near Toronto