thank you frontline to

Someone is selling lawn signs in Toronto to thank frontline workers

There have been all kinds of different initiatives in Toronto to show appreciation for the frontline workers who continue to risk their lives throughout the pandemic, and the latest project includes selling lawn signs to raise money for meals. 

Thank You Frontline TO is an initiative started by Toronto residents who decided to sell lawn signs to raise money for meals for hospital workers. 

"Thank You Frontline TO started when we decided to sell lawn signs in our neighbourhood to show our appreciation for healthcare workers and those working on the frontline," their website states.

"We had an outstanding outpour of support which lead to making a website to collect donations from everyone."

The signs can be purchased and delivered to your door for a donation of $10 (or more) and all the proceeds are being used to buy meals that will be dropped off at several Toronto hospitals.

The signs, which read "Thank you to all of the healthcare & frontline workers," can be delivered throughout the GTA. 

People who want one simply have to send an e-transfer directly to covidthankyou@gmail.com (use "Covid Thank You" as the name and no password is required as auto deposit is setup) or follow this link (this option only accepts credit or debit payment.)

The Thank You Frontline TO Instagram page features several photos of the signs erected on lawns across the city, and it's safe to say they're a bona fide way of getting this important message across loud and clear. 

Lead photo by

Thank You Frontline TO


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