new ontario license plate

New license plates have started to appear in Ontario

News that the Ontario government was planning to redesign license plates throughout the province was quite the hot topic last year, and now the new plates can finally be spotted on cars around town.

The province began rolling out the blue plates just days ago on February 1, and residents are once again comparing the new design to a box of Q-tips. 

The plates have a new background which includes the corner of a trillium, new colouring and, of course, a new slogan that reads "A place to grow."

"Ontario's new passenger and commercial licence plates represent what good government is all about," said Minister of Government and Consumer Services Bill Walker in a news release last April. 

"We are putting people back at the centre of every decision; making Ontario a business-friendly and pro-jobs province; and protecting what matters most so we can ensure Ontario is a place to grow: a place to grow your family, a place to grow your business, and a place to grow your community."

As Ontario residents continue to spot the new plates since they were released this past weekend, some are finding fault in their design and composition.

Some have even said the numbers and letters look slightly off-centre. 

Last April, the government said Ontario's previous plates were beaded and oversized compared to the North American standard for size. 

They said the new plates would use high definition sheeting that is stronger, brighter and longer lasting than before.

The province has also released a new design for commercial licence plates as well as a new driver's licence design in order to "enhance the quality, design and production of both important products while saving taxpayers millions of dollars each year."

The last time the province’s licence plate was redesigned was in 1982.

Lead photo by

Jon Degan


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