cost of living in toronto

New data shows just how expensive it will be to live in Toronto this year

Anyone living in Toronto already knows how exorbitant rent and other expenses are in this city, but why not sift through some more data that validates our pain?

A cost of living index released by Toronto financial rate comparison company LowestRates.ca has provided some estimates of what things like housing and transportation will cost for Torontonians in 2020, and how much residents will have to make to afford what is becoming a progressively less affordable city.

Homeowners paying off a standard mortgage for a house priced for the Toronto real estate market — houses in the city went for, on average, $883,520 in 2019 — can expect to pay about $4225 a month, according to the index.

For renters, living in a typical Toronto apartment will cost around $2,350 per month, though that number is ever-increasing.

Things like public transit set the typical Toronto resident back about $260 per month, while driving is quoted at three hundred dollars more, around $560 before things like parking, car maintenance and gas, which can easily at least double this number.

Cell phone and internet bills in the city average out around $155 altogether, while the index puts "entertainment costs" at just shy of $180 a month (though it would be all too easy to spend that in one weekend out in the city).

Gym memberships run at about $65 a month, though monthly rates at yoga or other types of specialty fitness studios can be well over $100.

It is worth noting that this data doesn't take into account things like debt, costs associated with pet (or child) ownership, clothes, services like haircuts and other non-necessary but really kind of necessary baseline expenditures.

But, with the things it does take into account, the index states that renters will have to make $55,500–$61,000 pre-tax to live in Toronto depending on if they drive or take transit, while for homeowners, this number is approximately $88,000–$94,000.

These estimates, again, do not consider crucial expenses like gas, car maintenance, debt payments, and clothing and household items — but also don't account for things like income sharing with a partner or living with roommates.

Basically, if you can't rely on a side hustle of selling foot pics or the bank of mom and dad (who were likely able to buy their first house in Toronto for $85,000 with stable, well-paying jobs that are unheard of nowadays), you'll probably be scrounging to make ends meet in Toronto.

But if you want to live well enough to eat more than Mr. Noodles, there are always fall-back places like the riveting Trenton or fashionable Fort McMurray.

Lead photo by

A Great Capture


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

The history of the Sunnylea neighbourhood in Toronto

This weird event in 1855 sparked the creation of the Toronto Police Force

10 organizations to support on GoFundMe instead of Adamson BBQ

Toronto finally decides to save the city's oldest tree and make it the focal point of a new park

Doug Ford tells protestors to stop going after his neighbours and acting like buffoons

Toronto is installing tons of free curb lane parking spots to support local businesses

Toronto agrees to clear snow from more sidewalks this winter

Here's the list of all streets in Toronto that could get dedicated transit lanes