speed limit ontario

The provincial government is increasing the speed limit on some Ontario highways

Road issues in Toronto, and the rest of Ontario, are plentiful. And while safety is a hot topic at the moment, so is traffic. 

In an attempt to solve the congestion issue, the provincial government just announced they'll be increasing the speed limit on select Ontario highways as a pilot project. 

Minister of Transportation Caroline Mulroney held a press conference at the Compass Centre in North York this morning to make the announcement. 

"Beginning Thursday, the highway speed limit will be posted at 110 km/h on three sections of highway in different regions across Ontario," Mulroney said. 

She said the pilot project will be implemented for two years on highway 402 from London to Sarnia, the QEW from St. Catharines to Hamilton, and highway 417 from Ottawa/Gloucester to the Quebec border. 

She added that cumulatively, this amounts to over 200 km of highway. 

Mulroney said the government is consulting directly with Ontario drivers, the general public and other stakeholders. 

"Starting today, I encourage all Ontarians to go online and participate in the survey," she said. "As Minister of Transportation, I want your input."

During the announcement, Mulroney added other cities across Canada have 110 km/h speed limits, and up until 1975, that was Ontario's speed limit as well. 

Some Ontario residents are on board with the announcement, and they're saying Ontario highways need an even higher speed limit increase. 

But others are saying it's a waste of money to replace all the signs for just 10 more kilometres. 

 And many are saying the change will only pose more danger on Ontario highways. 

And let's not pretend that most people don't drive 120 km/h as it is, so some are wondering if this means that will now increase to 130 km/h. 

There's no telling if the increase will become permanent as of yet, but Mulroney said any final decisions about speed limits on Ontario's highways will be informed by the consultations with the public.

Lead photo by

Andrew Badgley


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