market village toronto

Market Village has been almost completely demolished

Market Village is officially no more. The 28-year-old shopping centre in Markham has been almost entirely torn down, leaving nothing but a pile of rubble. 

The corner of Kennedy and Steeles now looks like a complete wasteland, with only remnants of the mall still intact. 

Demolition teams have been working away at the plaza—which opened in 1990—since October. It seems the west wing has been completely torn down, but it looks like it'll take a couple more months until the building is destroyed in full. 

Say goodbye to the 325,000-square-foot property that once housed a bustling food court, Sam's Congee, Lucky Aquarium, and at one point, a stable with live horses. 

The old building, which has been completely vacant since March 1, has long been slated to become The Remington Centre: a contemporary new 800,000 square-foot mall that will feature a night market. 

According to developers, the new building will also feature an indoor walkway that'll connect to its younger sister PMall—which is nice since people have had to walk outside to get between the buildings up until this point. 

It's unclear when the Remington Centre will be completed, or whether the old businesses that once occupied Market Village will re-open there. 

In the meantime, those who used to hit up Ginger and Onion for dim sum will have to hit up other restaurants in Markham for their Chinese food fix. 

Lead photo by

@strays000


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