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Hot weather could be a buzz kill for fall colours in Toronto

You've may have noticed it's very hot out right now. While it's been wonderful to have an extended summer, the hot weather might have already done its damage when it comes to fall colours.

Conditions looked to ideal for a stunning display of fall foliage around Toronto this year, but now that's been drawn into question.

According to Danielle Way, and assistant biology professor at Western University interviewed by the CBC, the record heat we've experienced means that many trees are still producing chlorophyll far later into the September than normal.

Trees are also under much stress from the drought over the past two weeks, which causes them to lose the colour-retaining moisture in their leaves. The result could be a lot of brown tones this year.

Toronto already witnesses less saturated fall colours on account of the waning Sugar Maple population in the city — replaced by the yellow-leaf bearing Norway Maple — so if our trees are damaged by a heat wave, it could result in a generally muted display.

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The news does not apply to regions north of the city, which are started to change colours a while ago and are now reaching their peak in places like Algonquin and Arrowhead Parks.

It's still too early to tell how badly the heat has hurt our chances for a brilliant display of fall colours when cooler weather returns, but even if the show isn't as good as it was once promised to be in the city, there are still plenty of ways to soak up fall colours.

Lead photo by

Jeremy Gilbert


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