solar eclipse toronto

This is how Toronto saw the solar eclipse

As promised, Toronto saw its first major solar eclipse since 1979 on Monday afternoon.

It was aight.

With coverage estimated to have been around 75%, the 'Great American Eclipse' wasn't as intense for Canadians as it was for our friends to the south, where many in the U.S. witnessed a total eclipse.

Still, the much-hyped astronomical event drew thousands of curious people outdoors at 2:30 p.m., some of them with DIY pinhole viewers, some of them with special eclipse glasses, and most of them with smartphones.

The partial eclipse seen in Toronto wasn't enough to make our day look like night, but the skies did take on an eerie dimness in much of the city throughout the event.

Those with the proper equipment to view and capture an eclipse on camera were happy to share their footage on Twitter.

For others, the event served as a social occasion. Viewing parties were held in Trinity Bellwoods Park, at The CNE, and at dozens of local businesses, connecting like-minded science fans in and around the eclipse's path.

If you missed today's partial eclipse, fear not – you'll have another chance in 2024, according to NASA. After that, our region is predicted to be eclipse-free until 2099.

Lead photo by

PK Gyamfi-Aidoo for Huge Toronto


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