free rom

You can now get free passes to the ROM and AGO in Toronto

The Toronto Public Library is not only lending you books this holiday season but now they're lending you passes to visit museums and art galleries across Toronto.

The Museum + Arts Pass program is back this year allowing Toronto residents to borrow free passes to local museums and art galleries around the city.

The goal of the program is to broaden access to Toronto's cultural life by giving residents the opportunity to visit the city's top cultural institutions.

All of the branches will be participating in the program, with passes for some venues only available at selected branches.

A few of the museums and art galleries you could visit with the pass include the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) and Royal Ontario Museum (ROM).

To get a pass, make sure you have a TPL card and head over to your closest branch to check out a MAP pass. Only one pass per person per week is allowed.

Depending on the venue, there may be restrictions on the number of people allowed with one pass but generally, each pass admits two adults and two children.

These passes can't be renewed or reserved. You don't have to return them but they have an expiry date of three months after check out. If you'd like to check out other places, you can sign out another pass later.

Passes are available starting Nov. 20.

Lead photo by

Andrew Williamson


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