stranger things toronto

Toronto fell over itself for Stranger Things at Nuit Blanche

Nuit Blanche is no stranger to lineups, but Toronto's love affair with Stranger Things remains uncanny. The Red Forest, a Netflix-based interactive exhibit featuring some of the streaming service's most popular shows, might have been the busiest stop at this year's festival.

Go figure that a corporate activation drew huge crowds at an event that was thematically organized around protest and resistance. Along with hype related to the return of Stranger Things and Riverdale, the other reason the exhibit was so popular is that it was completely intriguing.

Those who withstood the hour-long lineups got to dress up in hazmat suits before exploring a cinematically lit and totally eerie environment that seemed worlds apart from the shipping container city located a few hundred feet away at Nathan Phillips Square.

It wasn't exactly the Upside Down, but the odd combination of Riverdale and Stranger Things was visually compelling enough to garner buzz throughout the night.

If Nuit Blanche's chief calling card is spectacle, this certainly fit the bill, though some visitors were underwhelmed after all the hype the exhibit received beforehand. Meanwhile, others were just confused by the presence of people in hazmat suits.

It doesn't sound like anyone was particularly worried. As one passerby put it, "don't worry — it must be Nuit Blanche related."

Lead photo by

Hector Vasquez


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Arts

Meet the proprietor of Toronto's coolest comics store

This colour photo series shows how much Toronto has changed since the 1980s

Someone in Toronto is selling cartoons of local neighbourhood people

Toronto is getting a socially distanced outdoor show in the heart of downtown

Here's how Toronto bookstores are really doing during lockdown

Weird statue with Trump pin smashed shortly after appearing in Toronto

Toronto man sells ex-girlfriend's artwork online in under an hour

Toronto Public Library turns historic designs into free wrapping paper