This should be invisible

world press photo toronto

World's best photojournalism makes a stop in Toronto

World Press Photo is back in Toronto for another year, bringing some of the best photojournalism in the world to Allen Lambert Galleria at Brookfield Place. The local stop is part of a 45 country tour that sees the photographs displayed in over 80 cites. I doubt, however, that many of the venues along the way serves as quite so good a backdrop for the exhibition.

world press photo toronto

There's something almost restorative about watching so many people stop and become enthralled by these photos. For may who are out and about on lunch in the Financial District, the exhibit is startling in its beauty and scenes of devastation. You always get more than you bargained for when you stop to take a look.

world press photo toronto

One of the reasons for this is the range of the photos on display. There's hard photojournalism from war torn countries, there's gorgeous sports photography, and even nature images that'd serve as excellent candidates for the cover of National Geographic. In short, it's one of the best photography shows of the year, and it's completely free.

More Photos

world press photo toronto


world press photo torontoworld press photo torontoworld press photo torontoworld press photo torontoworld press photo toronto

World Press Photo runs until October 25, 2016.

Photos by Derek Flack.


Latest Videos



Latest Videos


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Arts

Toronto ranked one of world's best cities for creatives to live and work in

Toronto is getting a tribute to its most famous dead raccoon

Prince Harry's 'Spare' just became Indigo's fastest-selling non-fiction book ever

One Night Only is putting a much-needed spotlight on Toronto's emerging arts scene

People in Toronto really don't like the depressing art at Union Station

Reese Witherspoon is a fan of this NY Times bestselling author who is also a Toronto resident

Local bars take over Toronto contemporary art museum on free Friday nights

Toronto woman's Christmas charcuterie tree is the toast of the internet