Circuit Gallery Intangibles

Shot of Art: Circuit Gallery comes out of the cloud

Every once in a while Circuit Gallery leaves the cozy confines of the virtual world to show off the work of some of the artists featured on its website. These semi-regular exhibitions are just one of the ways that it distinguishes itself from other online art retailers and lives up to its name. For its most recent foray into the real world, Circuit is showing photographs from Robert Canali, Wayne Dunkley and S. Billie Mandle at Gallery 345. The theme around which these images are organized is tangibility — or, more appropriately, a lack thereof.

Each photographer engages in the challenge of "capturing" something intangible — a feat which by definition shouldn't be possible — and therein engages with one of photography's longest standing questions: can a photographic image ever be a faithful reproduction of what it purports to record?

The work in the show ranges from the abstract (Canali) to the representational (Dunkley and Mandle), but all of the images have an ethereal quality that's calming (think Rothko) but also stimulating (what am I looking at, and what does it mean?).

Intangibles runs until October 22nd. For more information and gallery hours, check here.

PHOTOS

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Photos by Jesse Milns


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