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The Periodic Table of Malfeasance

Trying to memorize the periodic table is not one of my fonder memories from high school. So, I was a bit amused to find a variant of it last night on the second floor of The Gladstone where I could actually understand if not relate to the elements contained therein.

Local artist Paul Gilroy has assembled what he calls the Periodic Table of Malfeasance on a chalkboard ready to form equations. Variables (or I guess elements) include tragedy, pillage, Jesus, Taiwan, Boi Band and other things a little less clinical than zirconium.

The piece is part of a new and wide ranging exhibit called the Upart Contemporary Art Fair that officially launches tonight (7-11) and runs through the end of the weekend.

New Periodic Table

Almost all the rooms on the second floor of The Gladstone have been transformed, sort of like Come Up to My Room except without the beds and furniture.

Some of the other art that caught my camera's attention included:

Upart

At left, an indoor electrical tower (with sound!) by the TH&B Collective. And right, a multi-channel video installation combining ambient sound with costumed animals by Emily Vey Duke and Cooper Battersby.

Upart Gladstone

At left, an installation by Francois Morrelli in which domestic integrity is shattered by a winged flying baby stroller dropping Ming-like porcelain plates. And right, uh, I can't seem to find anything in my notes on these ones so if anyone wants to enlighten me in the comments that'd be great!

Tomori Nagamoto

Above, one of a series of portraits by artist Tomori Nagamoto who seeks to challenge the expectations and misconceptions of visitors' perceptions of their experiences in Japan.


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