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Flickr Forum: February 22nd, 2008 - Family


So apparently when Queen St West burns down, Toronto's photographers get a little too preoccupied to focus on our weekly Flickr pool theme. Could you imagine if I'd selected fire as the theme? It would have been a phenomenal selection, which I'm sure I would have been viewing from behind bars.

Anyways, we still had some great contributions this week, and digging a bit back into the pool helped to filled out the mosaic. Click through to find out next week's theme.

1. Enjoying the music-- oh wait, those are earmuffs! by JaMmCat
2. Winter Child by TerraS
3. Communism is Hip. by JaMmCat
4. Where Did I Leave the Baby? by PDPhotography
5. Sick Kids Atrium by ariehsinger
6. The Apprentice. by SirCharlie
7. Family - Final by ariehsinger
8. Canadian Family by baroquedownpalace
9. L-O-L-A, Lola by ariehsinger

...wait a minute. I selected 3x from ariehsinger! And 2x from JaMmCat! Good work guys!

The next theme is "B&W" (aka Black and White), and as always, is open to creative interpretation. We're looking forward to featuring some of your images again, on February 29th.

To be considered for next week's selections:
- In Flickr, add the tag "b&w"
- Add to the blogTO Flickr pool
- If you have a photo already in the pool, and you would like it to be considered, remove the photo from the pool and re-add it. Only photos added in the past week will be considered.

If you have a theme suggestion, feel free to leave a comment.


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