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JUICE 2: Making The Invisible Visible


Hello all, and welcome to JUICE. Well really, it's JUICE2. Last year's event flew a little under the radar in Toronto, and was meant to be more of a local OCAD event for students and faculty. But this year's a different story all together. All are invited, starting this Thursday evening, to come listen, participate and absorb all that the impressive lineup of speakers has to offer. And if last year is any indication of the overall quality of this year's event, it'll definitely be worth dropping in for.

Now there are probably two main questions you're asking at this point...

1) How much does it cost?
2) Who's dropping by to lecture?

The complete schedule and lineup is posted online, but here are a few personal highlights for me...

Thursday, October 25 @ 6:45pm
Mike Fletcher of One Laptop Per Child

Friday, October 26 @ 6:45pm
Peter Jones of Redesign Research

Saturday, October 27 @ 4pm
Deborah Kaplan of Zerofootprint

And like I already mentioned, the event is completely free, so if you can't make some of the lectures, feel free just to drop by for the ones that you can. On top of the lectures themselves, there will also be a series of dialogues with all those invited, so anyone who wishes to participate and discuss ideas a little more in depth can easily do so. And to cap off the event, the good people at the OCAD Student Press are throwing an after party at Cafe La Gaffe on Saturday night.

So drop in and say hi. Maybe we'll all learn something.


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