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Contact 2007 Public Launch Party

"Arcade Vertigo" by Pramesh Attwala.

Unless you've been living under a rock you likely already know that May is a huge month for photography in Toronto. The month-long, multi-venue, internationally acclaimed Contact 2007 (which is now being hailed as the largest photography festival in the world) touts a line-up of over 500 artists that will be showing their works in over 200 venues across the city. It's huge, and it's Torontonian.

This Friday, the official festival launch party goes down in style once again at Brassaii Bistro.

Needless to say, blogTO is extremely proud to be participating as a media sponsor for the festival, and is truly honoured to be presenting at the opening party "A Constructed Image of Toronto" - a series of stunning photographs by some of our contributors, readers, and talented Toronto photobloggers.

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"Time in the Outskirts" by Jerrold Litwinenko.

Every year the launch party is a blast, and this year promises to be no exception. Artists, photographers, photo enthusiasts, and special guests will convene to enjoy food and drink, along with music, visual projections, and the blogTO print exhibit.

Pop in and join us at the party on Friday!

CONTACT PUBLIC LAUNCH
Friday MAY 4th, 7PM - midnight
@ Brassaii Bistro (map)
461 King St. W, Toronto (just west of Spadina)

The blogTO photo exhibit will remain on display at Brassaii Bistro until the end of May.


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