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Art|Body|Medicine

During a presentation this past semester I found myself in a rather heated argument with a professor over the boundaries between art and design. She made the claim that design served a useful purpose, and that art simply did not. Long story short, the argument remains unsettled.

I'd have to believe that the people behind Subtle Technologies would be on my side on this one though. This not-for-profit group of artists and scientists will be invading U of T and OCAD later this month for their 10th annual symposium entitled in situ: art | body | medicine. Running May 24th to the 27th, "Subtle Technologies presents practitioners of arts, sciences and medicines, and those who study their context, historians, ethicists, and other critical thinkers to contemplate how these disciplines can work together and reshape perspectives on the body."

Essentially they've gathered a number of talented, intelligent, and passionate individuals from both artistic and scientific fields to present and discuss projects that address the human body in new and interesting ways. Some projects focus on education. Others aim to heal. And some actually hope to change your perception of the human body entirely. Either way, the event seems to have quite a bit of "mind-blowing" potential, and in my humble opinion, that's simply the best kind.

in situ: art | body | medicine, presented by Subtle Technologies runs May 24th to 27th at U of T and OCAD. Visit their website for more details.


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