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Simplicity Rules: Picture 3 at the Convenience Gallery

It's the simplicity of the exhibit that makes it good. Lisa Klapstock's photographic presentation, entitled Picture 3 - Toronto, at the perpetually open Convenience Gallery on Lansdowne isn't in the most conspicuous of places, but if you catch it when you're walking by the Parkdale corner, be sure to stop and take a look.

It's an example of a basic photographic technique. Creating an interesting photo by using the aperture in a lens to increase or decrease the depth-of-field in an image- that is, the range of the image that is in focus. There are four panels in Klapstock's composition, each depicting the same scene taken with different aperture settings, giving us a unique perspective of a lush urban lawn scene. In my favourite panel, you can really see how shallow the depth-of-field is (I'd say, about 1/6th of the image), which I think can be a fairly desirable aspect of an interest photograph.

Picture 3 is the third installment in a series called Depiction, and another example of the artist's strong connection with Toronto- she takes common place glimpses, catches them in time, and shows us our city through her eyes. Klapstock has displayed her images in galleries across North America and Europe, and has participated in residencies in The Netherlands, Finland, Denmark, and Banff.

Convenience Gallery
58 Lansdowne Avenue
(at Seaforth Avenue, one block North of Queen)


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