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Emily Carr Unveiled at the AGO

It was media day at the AGO today which meant a selection of art and media types gathered in a small room for some speeches, smoked salmon and sliced fruit. It also marked the occasion of the launch of the gallery's extensive and impressive new Emily Carr exhibition.

The exhibition, which officially opens this Saturday March 3rd, shows a wide selection of her work including paintings that are noticeably influenced by the British Columbia landscape and First Nations cultures, as well as news clippings, journals, books and self-portraits.

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The art, of course, speaks for itself but among my favourites are those like the above filled with totem poles and a colour palette so rich it evokes memories (or was it approaching lunchtime?) of a really tasty sandwich. These are noticeable standouts from some of her other work on display which present more muted tones or trade in shades of green.

Rounding out the new exhibition are a selection of prints from Toronto-based First Nations photographer and Concordia grad

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Arthur Renwick. The prints, seen below, depict a series of simple and serene late 19th century churches that he photographed in various First Nations communities.

Emily Carr: New Perspectives on a Canadian Icon opens at the AGO (317 Dundas Street West at McCaul) on March 3rd, 2007 and continues through May 20th.


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