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Tearing Down Andrews' Architecture

Australian architect John Andrews was considered a groundbreaking genius in the sixties, fashioning plans based on a new kind of architecture: brutalism. He'd achieved Mr. Big status after completing Scarborough College for the University of Toronto and went on to build the tallest freestanding structure in the world - our beloved CN Tower. Back in the day concrete was king and brutalism was associated with a brave new social utopian ideology. Nowadays, people like Prince Charles refer unfavourably to the works as "piles of concrete". "Rubbish", I say. While they can sometimes give off a gloomy, almost heavy feel to the city blocks they dominate, they are as much a part of the urban landscape as the sidewalks and steel. In btonbrut's blogTO video called brutopia eclipsed we're shown other landmarks Andrews has created while questions arise as to why some are being destroyed.


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